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Glossary of Media Terms
MEDIA INDUSTRY TERMS

 
 
 

Popular Marketing and Advertising Terms

Welcome to TRUCK ADS® comprehensive glossary of media industry terms used to describe marketing and advertising services. The media industry, like many other industries, use a group of words, terms and acronyms with unique definitions. This glossary provides you with the definition of these terms used by many segments of the media industry, including television, print, out-of-home, truck side advertising and the internet.

 

Click a TERM to View the Media Industry Definition

An acronym for Area Designated Map. The national ADMAP Illustrates the location of all 210 U.S. U.S. Designated Market Regions.


ADMAP™ also identifies the Carrier Ad System banners and is a trademark of TRUCK ADS®.

There are seven common advertising metrics. 1.) reach is the number of people potentially exposed to an AD expressed as a percentage of population. 2.) frequency is the number of times an average individual has the opportunity to be exposed to an advertising message during a defined period of time. Frequency in outdoor usually refers to the calendar month since this time period coincides with standard contract practices. 3.) Gross Rating Points (GRPs) The total number of impressions delivered by a media schedule, expressed as a percentage of the population. 4.) Target Rating Points (TRPs) are Gross Rating Points times the ratio of the specifically targeted audience to the total audience. 5.) impressions is a term used by media to describe and quantify the number of individuals who have an "opportunity" to see an AD in a given amount of time. 6.) Cost per Thousand (CPM) It is a method for determining the cost of 1,000 exposures of an advertising message to potential customers for a product or service. 7.) Cost per Point (CPP) is the cost to reach one percent of the audience.

The number of panels in a showing. This could apply to website ADS, Newspaper ADS, Billboard ADS and Truck Side ADS. Outdoor truck advertisement allotments required to achieve a desired GRP level in a particular U.S. MEDIA MARKET vary.

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Click here for more about the Carrier AD System™

The total number of people or audience who have the opportunity to read an advertising message.

A term used to describe the "reach" of satellite dish, cable and broadcast TV within each Broadcast Market Area.  See Broadcast Market Area List. Each Broadcast Market Area is ranked by population and size is based on counties and/or sub-divisions of counties. There are no overlapping markets.

Advertising a brand repetitively, thus insuring the brand is remembered in the minds of the target market.

A name selected by the advertiser to identify a product to the consumer and to set apart from all other products.  Several product variations may exist within a designated brand.

A truck owner or fleet manager of trucks is known as a carrier.

The number of people passing an advertisement who have a reasonable opportunity to see the advertising message; potential viewers.  Outdoor circulation is based on traffic volume. Traffic volume is made up of two modes of transportation; automotive and pedestrian. Traffic volume is obtained by counting the number of pedestrians and automobiles passing any advertising structure (including trucks) during a specified time period. Automobiles counted are converted to persons by an occupancy factor of 1.35 persons per car.  For the most part, outdoor circulation reflects people in vehicles.

An acronym for "Cost Per Thousand".  It is a method for determining the cost of 1,000 exposures of an advertising message to potential customers for a product or service. Most advertising media recognize this means of cost measurement. See the best CPM calculator (shown at right) to calculate the CPM for your truck side ad campaign or fleet graphics program. Also, see DEC, below.

Truck Media Impressions Calculator

An acronym for "Cost per Point". It is the cost to reach one percent of the audience.

The same as DEC. See DEC next.

Is an acronym for Daily Effective Circulation (DEC). It is used to describe the average number of persons exposed to an AD or group of ADS for either 12 hours (un-illuminated) or 18-24 hours (illuminated).

WHAT DETERMINES DAILY EFFECTIVE CIRCULATION (DEC) ON TRUCKS
a.) Government traffic counts derived from public records.
b.) In-car views impressions that equal 1.35 people x the traffic count.
c.) In-car views reduced by a multiple factor of .45 for daylight only viewing.
d.) TRUCK ADS®
DEC impression count is a multiple factor of 2. See TRUCK ADS® 2X DEC Factor.

EXAMPLE DESCRIPTION Traffic Count from USDOT for NEW YORK MEDIA MARKET is (95,500 per day) x 1.35 people per vehicle x .45 (12 hours of daylight exposure). This is the total DEC PER TRUCK IN THE NEW YORK MEDIA MARKET. In this example the DEC is 58,000. DEC or Daily Effective Circulation is then used to determine GRP DESCRIBED BELOW.

EXAMPLE CALCULATION
95,000
x 1.35
x 0.45
DEC =  58,000

Related: Also See CPM Calculator

A TRUCK ADS® proprietary calculation. TRUCK ADS® 2X DEC Factor illustrates how increased counts are based on actual impressions not counted by TAB®. See DEC definition above.

The vital statistics of a population group or a derived sample, such as: age, sex, education, ethnic heritage, education, income, housing, etc.

A Designated Market Map illustrates the "reach" of satellite dish, cable and broadcast TV within each market area. (See Designated Market List) Each Designated Market is ranked by population and sized based on counties and/or sub-divisions of counties. There are no overlapping markets.

The exposure time during which the individual advertising message is on display.

In the media industry, DMA is an acronym for Designated Market Area. Nielsen® (a media company) defines DMA as a geographic group of counties in which the home market television stations hold a dominance of total hours viewed. Each Designated Market is ranked by population and sized based on counties and/or sub-divisions of counties. There are no overlapping markets.

Term associated with semi-trailers that are dropped at a designated location and cargo is unloaded. The carrier then leaves the semi-trailer and picks up another semi-trailer for the return trip.

Advertisers on TRUCK ADS® network of trucks are guaranteed an exclusive showing for the specific side or back of the truck their AD is shown unless they opt to share the space with another Advertiser. Receive a 10% discount off the published rate when you share the space.

The surface area or face where advertising copy is displayed.

Art that is complete in all respects; a true prototype of the anticipated reproduction; camera-ready.

The number of times an average individual has the opportunity to be exposed to an advertising message during a defined period of time. Frequency in outdoor usually refers to the calendar month since this time period coincides with standard contract practices.

Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) tracks the location of anything when a GPS transponder unit is installed. During a TRUCK ADS® campaign, GPS units are installed in each truck.

The total number of impressions delivered by a media schedule, expressed as a percentage of the population. GRP's for Outdoor generally refer to the Daily Effective Circulation (DEC) generated by poster panels divided by the market population. Often used interchangeably with "showing". One rating point represents a circulation equal to 1% of the market population. This is a daily percentage of persons who theoretically see an AD.

EXAMPLE CONDITIONS FOR TRUCKADS® GRP CALCULATION
a.) FIRST SELECT A MEDIA MARKET: WE SELECT NEW YORK WITH A POPULATION OF 17,000,000.
b.) CALCULATION FOR NEW YORK DEC (ABOVE) IS 58,000 IMPRESSIONS PER TRUCK X 10: 580,000 IMPRESSIONS.
c.) TOTAL TRUCKS NEEDED FOR CAMPAIGN TO REACH 3.4% OF THE POPULATION DAILY: 10.

EXAMPLE CALCULATION: Total population (17,000,000) divided by 580,000 DEC = 3.4 GRP or 3.4% of the population is reached each day in the NEW YORK Media Market using 10 trucks with wrap around ads.

Also known as "visual impressions", is a term used by media to describe and quantify the number of individuals who have an "opportunity" to see an AD in a given amount of time. See CPM. TRUCK ADS® "Impressions Calculators" can help you determine the CPM's for your truck side advertising campaign. See CPM Visual Impressions Calculators.

The average number of persons riding in each vehicle. The load factor is determined through national research as well as evaluation of government research and reports for highway capitalization. TRUCK ADS® currently uses a load factor of 1.35 persons per vehicle based upon collective research studies.

Location, location, location. What more can you say about it, except that it means everything in advertising.

Refers to an area as defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).  A Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) is defined by a distinct rural boundary, completely surrounding the MSA. Population aggregates are based on statistics from the US Government's, 2001 Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) studies.

There are three (3) types of mobile billboards. Click here for a detailed description of all three. Mobile billboards are for hire and travel where the advertiser wants them to travel. They are hired by the day, week or month.

1) A-Frame mobile billboards
2) Video TV mobile trucks
3) LED mobile billboards

Mobile billboard trucks are also known as advertising trucks, ad trucks, ad mobile trucks, mobile ads and mobile ad trucks. The entire group of trucks have all been developed in the past 10-15 years.

Refers to ADS on trucks. Advertisers who purchase AD space may want to share the side of the truck but not the banner. AD space is sold exclusively. Shared space rates are available, if two or more advertisers want to share the space.

Inclusive term that refers to a wide array of out-of-home media designed to reach the consumer outside the home, including transit, bus shelters, bus benches, aerials, airports, in-flight, in-store, movies, college campus/high schools, hotels, shopping malls, sport facilities, stadiums, taxis, telephone kiosks, trucks, truck stops, mobile billboards, truck media and other specialized media.

All of the outdoor advertising structures in a given city, town or area operated by an outdoor company or plant operator.

The number of 100 GRP showings available in a given geographical area gives you the plant capacity. This is determined by dividing the total panels in an area by the number of panels which make a 100 GRP showing.

Detailed information sent to the plant operator covering the display of a particular poster design. These instructions usually include as much marketing information as possible so that the seller can choose the panels which have the greatest efficiency in reaching the advertiser's target audience.

The number of people potentially exposed to an AD expressed as a percentage of population.

Advertising that reaches multiple cities in U.S. Media Markets.

A physical inspection of the posted advertising buy. Either a pre-buy or post-buy action.

The total number of panels in a buy.  The common advertising weights are GRP/Showing 25, 50, 75 and 100 which relate directly to the percentage of the population of a market.  For example, a 50 showing will deliver 500,000 daily exposures in a market with one million people in it.  A 25 showing will deliver 250,000 daily exposures.  A showing size does not indicate the number of poster panels utilized.

A truck that is not in operation is sidelined during a specified period.

It is non-invasive advertising. Those targeted are not forced to view an AD or in the alternative to switch channels or turn the page to avoid an AD as would be necessary with TV, radio, newspapers and magazines. Truck side advertising is a good example of soft target advertising, because it appears to be coincidental. This phrase was first coined by TRUCKADS®. See article.

A display designed to attract immediate attention by virtue of its size or unique style. It is advertising that sticks out like a sore thumb.

A consumer group selected to be reached by an advertiser. For outdoor advertising the vast majority of the target audience are age 18 to 54 and coincide with the population of the surrounding media market.

Target Rating Points (TRP) are Gross Rating Points times the ratio of the specifically targeted audience to the total audience.

A term adopted by the FCC to describe the reach of broadcast TV signals within each Television Market Area. See Television Market Area List. Each market is ranked by population and size is based on counties and/or sub-divisions of counties. There are no overlapping markets.

The number of vehicles that travel a road each day. Traffic count is used to calculate DEC and is supplied by city, county or state agencies. State traffic counts are taken on most roadways in three-year cycles.

Out-of-home (OOH) media appearing on the exterior or interior of public transportation vehicles or stations (buses, trains, commuter rail, trucks, mobile billboards, subways, platforms, terminals, etc.).

A patented vinyl banner frame system that attaches vinyl banners to trucks and walls. TRUCKADS® Frame Kit is called the INVISIBLE MEDIA FRAME SYSTEM® and is made of high strength polymer materials. It attaches to the banner and supporting structure with VHB® adhesive. There are no bolts or rivets to install. Ask for it at your local sign shop or order online and do it yourself.

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    Invisible and Strong TRUCK ADS® Frame Kit
TRUCK ADS® Banner Frame Kit - So Easy you can Do it Yourself (DIY)

Also referred to as truck advertising, truckside advertising and truck media. Ads are affixed to the sides, front or rear of local delivery trucks and long haul big rig trucks, owned by independent carriers. A third party broker usually coordinates and executes the truck media services for an advertiser. Ad rates published here.

Local Metro Truck Advertising - Box Trucks
Ads are displayed on local delivery box trucks. Advertisers choose a specific media market to advertise in, but have no control over where a local delivery box truck travels or parks within the media market. Deliveries are made to local businesses and residences in the media market. Often times, routes are specific and sometimes they are not because deliveries to specific businesses and residences vary daily. Also, traffic conditions can interrupt routinely traveled routes. Depending on the size of the market, delivery trucks travel major interstates, highways, primary roads and secondary roads within a given market. Average time on the road is 20 to 22 days, per month.

Regional Tractor Trailer Advertising - Fixed Trailer
Ads are displayed on regional (big rig) semi-trailers. Also known as a tractor-trailer. The tractor and trailer always stay together. Advertisers choose a regional section of the US to advertise in, but have no control over what roads a semi-trailer delivery truck travels or parks. Delivery trucks travel major interstates and highways for 4-5 hours per day and local primary roads and secondary roads within a given market for the remainder of the 8-10 hour work day. Trucks make deliveries to local warehouses and businesses in one or more media markets. Often times, delivery trucks travel specific routes and sometimes they do not because deliveries to specific businesses vary daily. Also, traffic conditions can interrupt routinely traveled routes. Average time on the road is 24 to 27 days, per month.

Regional Tractor Trailer Advertising - Drop and Hook
Displayed on regional (big rig) semi-trailers participating in drop and hook operations. Ad rates are 10% less than published ad rates because the trailers spend less time on the road than a fixed trailer. Average time on the road is 16 to 20 days, per month. All other definition details are the same as fixed trailer advertising.

The number of displays or printed material underrun or short of the number specified in the order.

U.S. Media Markets are based on the "reach" of satellite dish, cable and broadcast TV within each U.S. Media Market.  See U.S. Media Market List. Each market is ranked by population and size is based on counties and/or sub-divisions of counties. There are no overlapping markets.

TRUCK ADS® visual aid tool was designed to help the user see what an advertisement looks like on the side of various truck types and then print them out for presentations and proposals. This useful truck side advertising proposal tool is used by sign companies, mobile billboard owners and truck side advertising companies, as well as truck owners and advertisers.

A roll of continuous printing. In the case of truck side advertising, a wrap around ad describes advertising on two sides and the back or just the two sides. A full wrap around ad includes the back of a truck. See More.

 
 

  

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